Atlantic premiers warn of new Air Passenger Protection Rules

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Atlantic Canada’s 4 premiers say proposed changes to Canada’s Air Passenger Protection Polices could lead to a reduction of routes and raise in price ranges across the area.

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In a letter to federal Transport Minister Pablo Rodriguez, the Council of Atlantic Premiers question for an ongoing review of restrictions to be “reconsidered.”

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“We are worried that the proposed regulatory variations are likely to necessarily mean even more enhanced fees for Atlantic inhabitants as airlines appear to recoup the expenditures of regulatory compliance,” writes council chair and Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Andrew Furey. “It may possibly also consequence in airways turning into hesitant to continue on, resume or offer company to regional markets, ultimately limiting regional air accessibility for travellers.”

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None of the four Atlantic premiers had been manufactured out there on Tuesday to talk about the letter, which cites an illustration of payment for delays triggered by mechanical situations and the requirement for passengers to be re-booked inside of nine hours.

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The letter calls the illustration a “proposed adjust,” having said that it is provided in present regulations

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“The premiers are talking out versus about what they feel to be a new alter, that has previously been in position given that the inception of the APPR,” says Gábor Lukács, a Canadian air passenger rights advocate and president of Air Passenger Rights, who named the Council of Atlantic Premiers’ letter “ill-knowledgeable.”

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The Canadian Transportation Company held consultations past summertime to “strengthen” the 2019 restrictions, publishing a “What We Heard” report this past November.

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Lukács says the premier’s ask for for a alter in the system of producing new polices is “inappropriate.”

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“That’s interference with a course of action that has currently been initiated, has now been carried out pursuant to federal parliament’s will,” says Lukács. “The premiers are pretty late in the video game now.”

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‘We want federal government to get a pause’

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The affiliation representing 13 airports across Atlantic Canada submitted its have thoughts on long term Air Passenger Safety Rules through final year’s session process

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“We want federal government to get a pause,” suggests Nadia MacDonald, executive director of the Atlantic Canadian Airports Association, in an job interview on Tuesday. “We court docket airways to come to our industry, and if our current market in Atlantic Canada is a riskier selection in comparison to other regions of the country since of the new policies and absence of frequency, then it would make that courtship much more hard.”

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MacDonald states rules and penalties must approach airlines operating within just Atlantic Canada in different ways.

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“What is becoming proposed does not get into account the frequency of flights in a regional sector, which is typically two-to-3 occasions a 7 days,” says MacDonald.

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A penned assertion from Transportation Canada on Tuesday states forthcoming draft polices will recognize “that regional and distant airports function in different ways,” without elaborating further more.